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Reinforced Concrete Beams, Columns and Frames: Section and Slender Member Analysis

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Descripción

This book is focused on the theoretical and practical design of reinforced concrete beams, columns and frame structures. It is based on an analytical approach of designing normal reinforced concrete structural elements that are compatible with most international design rules, including for instance the European design rules – Eurocode 2 – for reinforced concrete structures.


Características

  • ISBN: 978-1-84821-569-6
  • Tamaño: 17x24
  • Edición:
  • Idioma: Inglés
  • Año: 2013

Compra bajo pedidoDisponibilidad: 3 a 7 Días

Contenido Reinforced Concrete Beams, Columns and Frames: Section and Slender Member Analysis

This book is focused on the theoretical and practical design of reinforced concrete beams, columns and frame structures. It is based on an analytical approach of designing normal reinforced concrete structural elements that are compatible with most international design rules, including for instance the European design rules – Eurocode 2 – for reinforced concrete structures. The book tries to distinguish between what belongs to the structural design philosophy of such structural elements (related to strength of materials arguments) and what belongs to the design rule aspects associated with specific characteristic data (for the material or loading parameters). A previous book, entitled Reinforced Concrete Beams, Columns and Frames – Mechanics and Design, deals with the fundamental aspects of the mechanics and design of reinforced concrete in general, both related to the Serviceability Limit State (SLS) and the Ultimate Limit State (ULS), whereas the current book deals with more advanced ULS aspects, along with instability and second-order analysis aspects. Some recent research results including the use of non-local mechanics are also presented. This book is aimed at Masters-level students, engineers, researchers and teachers in the field of reinforced concrete design. Most of the books in this area are very practical or code-oriented, whereas this book is more theoretically based, using rigorous mathematics and mechanics tools.

Table of Contents

Preface  ix

Chapter 1. Advanced Design at Ultimate Limit State (ULS)

1.1. Design at ULS – simplified analysis   
1.1.1. Simplified rectangular behavior – rectangular cross-section 
1.1.2. Simplified rectangular behavior – T-cross-section  
1.1.3. Comparison of design between serviceability limit state and ultimate limit state
1.1.4. Biaxial bending of a rectangular cross-section
1.2. ULS – extended analysis 
1.2.1. Bilinear constitutive law for concrete – rectangular cross-section    
1.2.2. Parabola–rectangle constitutive law for concrete – rectangular cross-section   
1.2.3. T-cross-section – general resolution for bilinear or parabola–rectangle laws for concrete 
1.2.4. T-cross-section – general equations for composed bending with normal forces 
1.3. ULS – interaction diagram 
1.3.1. Theoretical formulation of the interaction diagram
1.3.2. Approximation formulations    
1.3.3. Graphical results for general cross-sections

Chapter 2. Slender Compression Members – Mechanics and Design

2.1. Introduction    
2.2. Analysis methods   
2.2.1. General     
2.2.2. Requirements to second-order analysis
2.3. Member and system instability   
2.3.1. Elastic critical load and effective (buckling) length
2.3.2. System instability principles    
2.3.3. Concrete column instability – limit load  
2.4. First- and second-order load effects  
2.4.1. Global and local second-order effects   
2.4.2. Single members   
2.4.3. Frame mechanics – braced and bracing columns
2.4.4. Moment equilibrium at joints    
2.5. Maximum moment formation 
2.5.1. Maximum first- and second-order moment at the same section    
2.5.2. Maximum first- and second-order moment at different sections 
2.5.3. Curvature-based maximum moment expression  
2.5.4. Unbraced frame application example   
2.6. Local and global slenderness limits
2.6.1. Local, lower slenderness limits – general 
2.6.2. EC2 – local lower slenderness limits   
2.6.3. NS-EC2 – Local lower slenderness limits   
2.6.4. Comparison of the EC2 and NS-EC2 limits
2.6.5. Local upper slenderness limit   
2.6.6. Global lower slenderness limit  
2.7. Effect of creep deformations 
2.7.1. General    
2.7.2. Effects on load and deformation capacity 
2.7.3. Approximate calculation of creep effects  
2.8. Geometric imperfections   
2.8.1. Imperfection inclination  
2.8.2. Stiffening structural elements   
2.8.3. Stiffened and isolated structural elements   
2.9. Elastic analysis methods   
2.9.1. Principles, equilibrium and compatibility
2.9.2. Equilibrium and compatibility at multiple sections  
2.9.3. Optimization
2.10. Practical linear elastic analysis  
2.10.1. Stiffness assumptions 
2.10.2. EC2 approach     
2.10.3. ACI 318 approach   
2.11. Simplified analysis and design methods   
2.11.1. General  
2.11.2. Simplified second-order analysis  
2.11.3. Method based on nominal stiffness
2.11.4. Method based on nominal curvature  
2.12. ULS design   
2.12.1. Simplified design methods  
2.12.2. Alternative design methods 
2.12.3. Design example – framed column

Chapter 3. Approximate Analysis Methods  

3.1. Effective lengths 
3.1.1. Definition and exact member analysis  
3.1.2. EC2 effective length of isolated members   
3.1.3. Alternative effective length expressions  
3.1.4. Columns with beam restraints
3.2. Method of means    
3.2.1. General     
3.2.2. Method of means – typical steps   
3.2.3. Application of the method of means
3.3. Global buckling of unbraced or partially braced systems
3.3.1.General considerations   
3.3.2. Flexibility factors  
3.3.3. System instability and “system” effective lengths
3.3.4. Instability of partially braced column – example 
3.3.5. Instability of partially braced frame – example  
3.3.6. Sway buckling of unbraced multistory frames  
3.4. Story sway and moment magnification
3.4.1. General    
3.4.2. Partially braced column – example
3.4.3. Partially braced frame – example   
3.4.4. Sway magnifier prediction of frames with single curvature regions
3.4.5. Iterative elastic analysis method
3.4.6. Global magnifiers for sway and moments

Appendix 1. Cardano’s Method

A1.1. Introduction   
A1.2. Roots of a cubic function – method of resolution  
A1.2.1. Canonical form 
A1.2.2. Resolution – one real and two complex roots  
A1.2.3. Resolution – two real roots    
A1.2.4. Resolution – three real roots 
A1.3. Roots of a cubic function – synthesis
A1.3.1. Summary of Cardano’s method   
A1.3.2. Resolution of a cubic equation – example
A1.4. Roots of a quartic function – principle of resolution
Appendix 2. Steel Reinforcement Table 
Bibliography      
Index

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