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FRP-Strengthened Metallic Structures

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Descripción

FRP-Strengthened Metallic Structures explores the behaviour and design of these structures, from basic concepts to design recommendations. It covers bond behaviour between FRP and steel, and describes improvement of fatigue performance, bending, compression, and bearing forces, strengthening of compression and steel tubular members, strengthening for enhanced fatigue and seismic performance, and strengthening against web crippling of steel sections. It also provides examples of performance improvement by FRP strengthening.


Características

  • ISBN: 9781138074330
  • Páginas: 290
  • Tamaño: 17x24
  • Edición:
  • Idioma: Inglés
  • Año: 2017

Compra bajo pedidoDisponibilidad: 3 a 7 Días

Contenido FRP-Strengthened Metallic Structures

Provides a comprehensive treatment of the behaviour and design of FRP-strengthened metallic structures

Includes descriptions and explanations of basic concepts

Offers design recommendations and presents design examples

Summary

Repairing or strengthening failing metallic structures traditionally involves using bulky and heavy external steel plates that often pose their own problems. The plates are generally prone to corrosion and overall fatigue. Fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP), a composite material made of a polymer matrix reinforced with fibers, offers a great alternative for strengthening metallic structures, especially steel structures such as bridges, buildings, offshore platforms, pipelines, and crane structures.


FRP-Strengthened Metallic Structures explores the behaviour and design of these structures, from basic concepts to design recommendations. It covers bond behaviour between FRP and steel, and describes improvement of fatigue performance, bending, compression, and bearing forces, strengthening of compression and steel tubular members, strengthening for enhanced fatigue and seismic performance, and strengthening against web crippling of steel sections. It also provides examples of performance improvement by FRP strengthening.


Summarizes worldwide research on the FRP strengthening of metallic structures

Contains several topics not generally covered in existing texts

Presents comprehensive, topical references throughout the book

The book outlines the applications, existing design guidance, and special characteristics of FRP composites within the context of their use in structural strengthening. While the major focus is on steel structures, it also describes others, such as aluminium structures. This book is suitable for structural engineers, researchers, and university students interested in the FRP strengthening technique.
 

INDEX


Preface
Acknowledgments
Notation
Author


1 Introduction

1.1 Applications of FRP in strengthening metallic structures
1.2 Improved performance due to FRP strengthening
1.3 Current knowledge on FRP strengthening of metallic structures
1.4 Layout of the book 1
References

2 FRP composites and metals

2.1 General
2.2 Fibre-reinforced polymer
   2.2.1 Carbon fibre-reinforced polymers
   2.2.2 Glass fibre-reinforced polymers
2.3 Adhesives
2.4 Cast/wrought iron, steel, and aluminium
   2.4.1 Cast/wrought iron
   2.4.2 Steel
   2.4.3 Aluminium
2.5 Future work
References

3 Behaviour of the bond between FRP and metal

3.1 General
3.2 Testing methods
   3.2.1 Methods of bond test
   3.2.2 Methods of strain measurement
3.3 Failure modes
   3.3.1 Typical failure modes
   3.3.2 Key parameters affecting failure modes
3.4 Bond–slip model
   3.4.1 Strain distribution
   3.4.2 Bond–slip curves
   3.4.3 Bond–slip model
   3.4.4 Estimation of bond strength and effective bond length
      3.4.4.1 Hart-Smith (1973) model and Xia and Teng (2005) model for bond between CFRP plate and steel
      3.4.4.2 Modified Hart-Smith model (Fawzia et al. 2006) for bond between CFRP sheets and steel
3.5 Effect of temperature on bond strength
   3.5.1 Influence of subzero temperature on bond strength
   3.5.2 Influence of elevated temperature on bond strength
   3.5.3 Theoretical analysis of effect of elevated temperature on bond
3.6 Effect of cyclic loading on bond strength
3.7 Effect of impact loading on bond strength
   3.7.1 Effect of impact loading on material properties
   3.7.2 Effect of impact loading on bond strength
3.8 Durability of bond between FRP and metal
3.9 Future work
References

4 Flexural strengthening of steel and steel–concrete composite beams with FRP laminates
J. G. TENG AND D. FERNANDO


4.1 General
4.2 Failure modes
   4.2.1 General
   4.2.2 In-plane bending failure
   4.2.3 Lateral buckling
   4.2.4 End debonding
   4.2.5 Intermediate debonding
   4.2.6 Local buckling of plate elements
4.3 Flexural capacity of FRP-plated steel/composite sections
   4.3.1 General
   4.3.2 FRP-plated steel sections
   4.3.3 FRP-plated steel–concrete composite sections
      4.3.3.1 Neutral axis in the concrete slab
   4.3.4 Effects of preloading
   4.3.5 Moment–curvature responses
4.4 Lateral buckling
4.5 Debonding failures
   4.5.1 General
   4.5.2 Interfacial stresses in elastic FRP-plated beams
   4.5.3 Cohesive zone modelling of debonding failure
   4.5.4 End debonding
      4.5.4.1 General
      4.5.4.2 FE modelling
      4.5.4.3 Analytical modelling
      4.5.4.4 Suppression through detailing
   4.5.5 Intermediate debonding
   4.5.6 Local buckling
      4.5.6.1 Design against flange and web buckling
      4.5.6.2 Additional strengthening against local buckling
4.6 Other issues
   4.6.1 Strengthening of beams without access to the tension flange surface
   4.6.2 Rapid strengthening methods
   4.6.3 Fatigue strengthening
4.7 Design recommendation
   4.7.1 General
   4.7.2 Critical sections and end anchorage
   4.7.3 Strength of the maximum moment section
      4.7.3.1 Moment capacity at in-plane failure
      4.7.3.2 Moment capacity at lateral buckling failure
      4.7.3.3 Design against local buckling
4.8 Design example
      4.8.1 Geometric and material properties of the beam
      4.8.2 In-plane moment capacity of plated section
      4.8.3 Suppression of end debonding
      4.8.4 Design against local buckling
4.9 Conclusions and future research needs
References

5 Strengthening of compression members

5.1 General
5.2 Methods of strengthening
5.3 Structural behaviour
    5.3.1 Failure modes
    5.3.2 Load versus displacement curves
5.4 Capacity of FRP-strengthened steel sections
    5.4.1 CFRP-strengthened CHS sections
       5.4.1.1 Modified AS 4100 model
       5.4.1.2 Modified EC3 model
       5.4.1.3 Design curves
    5.4.2 GFRP-strengthened CHS sections
    5.4.3 CFRP-strengthened SHS sections
       5.4.3.1 Bambach et al. stub column model
       5.4.3.2 Shaat and Fam stub column model
    5.4.4 CFRP-strengthened lipped channel sections
       5.4.4.1 Modified EC3 stub column model
       5.4.4.2 Modified AISI-DSM stub column model
    5.4.5 CFRP-strengthened T-sections
5.5 Capacity of CFRP-strengthened steel members
    5.5.1 CFRP-strengthened SHS columns
       5.5.1.1 Fibre model and FE analysis
       5.5.1.2 Shaat and Fam column model
    5.5.2 CFRP-strengthened lipped channel columns
       5.5.2.1 Modified EC3 column model
       5.5.2.2 Modified AISI-DSM column model
5.6 Plastic mechanism analysis of CFRP-strengthened SHS under large axial deformation
    5.6.1 Equivalent yield stress due to CFRP strengthening
    5.6.2 Plastic mechanism analysis
5.7 Design examples
    5.7.1 Example 1: CFRP-strengthened CHS stub column
       5.7.1.1 Solution using the modified AS 4100 model given in Section 5.4.1.1
       5.7.1.2 Solution using the modified EC3 model given in Section 5.4.1.2
    5.7.2 Example 2: CFRP-strengthened SHS stub column with local buckling
    5.7.3 Example 3: CFRP-strengthened SHS stub column without local buckling
    5.7.4 Example 4: CFRP-strengthened SHS slender column
5.8 Future work
References 1

6 Strengthening of web crippling of beams subject to end bearing forces

6.1 General
6.2 Cold-formed steel rectangular hollow sections
   6.2.1 Types of strengthening
   6.2.2 Failure modes
   6.2.3 Behaviour
   6.2.4 Increased capacity
   6.2.5 Design formulae
      6.2.5.1 Design formulae for unstrengthened RHS
      6.2.5.2 Design formulae for CFRP-strengthened RHS (if web buckling governs for unstrengthened RHS)
      6.2.5.3 Design formulae for CFRP-strengthened RHS (if web yielding governs for unstrengthened RHS)
6.3 Aluminium rectangular hollow sections
   6.3.1 Types of strengthening
   6.3.2 Failure modes
   6.3.3 Behaviour
   6.3.4 Increased capacity
   6.3.5 Design formulae
      6.3.5.1 Modified AS 4100 formulae for unstrengthened aluminium RHS
      6.3.5.2 Modified AS 4100 formulae for CFRP-strengthened aluminium RHS
      6.3.5.3 AS/NZS 1664.1 formula for web bearing capacity of aluminium RHS
      6.3.5.4 Modified AS/NZS 1664.1 formula for web bearing capacity of CFRP-strengthened aluminium RHS
6.4 LiteSteel beams
      6.4.1 Types of strengthening
      6.4.2 Failure modes and behaviour
      6.4.3 Increased capacity
      6.4.4 Design formulae
         6.4.4.1 Modified AS 4100 formulae for unstrengthened LiteSteel beams
         6.4.4.2 Modified AS 4100 formulae for CFRP-strengthened LiteSteel beams
6.5 Open sections
     6.5.1 Types of strengthening
     6.5.2 Failure modes and increased capacity
     6.5.3 Design formulae
         6.5.3.1 Modified Young and Hancock (2001) formulae for CFRP-strengthened channel section
         6.5.3.2 Modified AS 4100 formulae for CFRP-strengthened I-section
6.6 Design examples
    6.6.1 Example 1 (cold-formed RHS)
         6.6.1.1 Solution according to AS 4100 given in Section 6.2.5 for unstrengthened RHS
         6.6.1.2 Solution according to modified AS 4100 given in Section 6.2.5 for CFRP-strengthened RHS
    6.6.2 Example 2 (aluminium RHS)
        6.6.2.1 Solution according to modified AS 4100 given in Section 6.3.5
        6.6.2.2 Solution according to modified AS 1664.1 given in Section 6.3.5
    6.6.3 Example 3 (LiteSteel beams)
        6.6.3.1 Solution according to modified AS 4100 given in Section 6.4.4 for unstrengthened LSB
        6.6.3.2 Solution according to modified AS 4100 given in Section 6.4.4 for CFRP-strengthened LSB
6.7 Future work
References

7 Enhancement of fatigue performance

7.1 General
7.2 Methods of strengthening
7.3 Improvement in fatigue performance
7.4 Fatigue crack propagation
7.5 Prediction of fatigue life for CCT (centre-cracked tensile) steel plates strengthened by multiple layers of CFRP sheet
   7.5.1 Boundary element method approach
      7.5.1.1 Boundary element method
      7.5.1.2 BEM model of CCT steel plates strengthened by multiple layers of CFRP sheet
      7.5.1.3 BEM simulation results
   7.5.2 Fracture mechanics approach
      7.5.2.1 Fracture mechanics formulae for CCT steel plates
      7.5.2.2 Average stress in steel plate with CFRP sheet
      7.5.2.3 Effective stress intensity factor in steel plate with CFRP sheet
      7.5.2.4 Fatigue life of CCT steel plates strengthened by multiple layers of CFRP sheet
7.6 Stress intensity factor for CCT steel plates strengthened by CFRP
     7.6.1 Existing approaches
     7.6.2 Stress intensity factor for CCT steel plates without CFRP
     7.6.3 Influence on stresses in steel plate due to CFRP
     7.6.4 Influence of crack length and CFRP bond width on SIF
     7.6.5 SIF for CCT steel plates strengthened by CFRP
     7.6.6 Influence of key parameters on SIF reduction due to CFRP strengthening
7.7 Future work
References
Index
 

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