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Port Designer´s Handbook

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Descripción

The Port Designer’s Handbook, Third edition provides practising port and harbour consulting engineers with essential guidance and recommendations for the layout, design and construction of modern harbour and port structures. The third edition is extensively revised and discusses various factors to consider when designing efficient container terminals. Water depth, berth structure, and environmental forces are discussed in line with PIANC recommendations and considerations.


Características

  • ISBN: 9780727760043
  • Páginas: 608
  • Tamaño: 17x24
  • Edición:
  • Idioma: Inglés
  • Año: 2014

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Contenido Port Designer´s Handbook

Port Designer’s Handbook, Third edition provides practising port and harbour consulting engineers with essential guidance and recommendations for the layout, design and construction of modern harbour and port structures. The third edition is extensively revised and discusses various factors to consider when designing efficient container terminals. Water depth, berth structure, and environmental forces are discussed in line with PIANC recommendations and considerations.

The latest developments in navigation safety, site selection, layout, cargo handling, and mooring principles are outlined and evaluated, and operational conditions for ships in channels and harbour basins are discussed. Drawing on PIANC specifications, international harbour standards and recommendations are thoroughly explored. This handbook is an invaluable resource to practising port and harbour consulting engineers as well as contractors involved in the layout, design and construction of berth and harbour structures.

Port Designer’s Handbook, Third edition:

  • provides revised calculations for wind, current and wave forces according to the PIANC and international specification and recommendations
  • demonstrates safety considerations, calculations, evaluations and recommendations in line with PIANC and Eurocode specifications
  • outlines design considerations relating to loadings, berth structures, cargo handling equipment and berthing forces
  • details open berth structures including larger types of vessels e.g. large oil and LNG tankers which need increased water depth for berthing
  • discusses new container handling equipment and the demand for more efficient container terminals based on the new PIANC recommendations

 

Contents and Preliminary Pages

Port planning


1.1. Introduction
1.2. Planning procedures
1.3. Subsurface investigations
1.4. Hydraulic laboratory studies
1.5. Life-cycle management
1.6. Safety management and risk assessment
1.7. The International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code and the Container Security Initiative (CSI) References and further reading

Environmental forces

2.1. General
2.2. Wind
2.3. Waves
2.4. Current
2.5. Ice forces References and further reading

Channels and harbour basins

3.1. Channels and waterways
3.2. Harbour basin
3.3. Anchorage areas
3.4. Area of refuge
3.5. Grounding areas References and further reading
 
Berthing requirements

4.1. Operational conditions
4.2. Navigation
4.3. Tugboat assistance
4.4. Wind and wave restrictions
4.5. Ship movements
4.6. Passing ships
4.7. Visibility
4.8. Port regulations
4.9. Availability of a berth References and further reading

Impact from ships

5.1. General
5.2. The theoretical or kinetic method
5.3. The empirical method
5.4. The statistical method
5.5. Abnormal impacts
5.6. Absorption of fender forces
5.7. Ship ‘hanging’ on the fenders References and further reading

Design considerations

6.1. General
6.2. Design life
6.3. Standards, guidelines and design codes
6.4. Load combinations and limit states
6.5. Load and concurrency factors
6.6. Material factors and material strength
6.7. Characteristic loads from the sea side
6.8. Vertical loads on berth structures
6.9. Horizontal loads on the berth
6.10. Characteristic loads from the land side
6.11. Summary of loads acting from the sea side References and further reading

Safety considerations

6.1. General
6.2. Design life
6.3. Standards, guidelines and design codes
6.4. Load combinations and limit states
6.5. Load and concurrency factors
6.6. Material factors and material strength
6.7. Characteristic loads from the sea side
6.8. Vertical loads on berth structures
6.9. Horizontal loads on the berth
6.10. Characteristic loads from the land side
6.11. Summary of loads acting from the sea side References and further reading

Types of berth structures

8.1. General
8.2. Vertical loads
8.3. Horizontal loads
8.4. Factors affecting the choice of structures
8.5. Norwegian and international berth construction References and further reading

Gravity-wall structures

9.1. General
9.2. Block wall berths
9.3. Caisson berths
9.4. Cell berths References and further reading

Sheet pile wall structures

10.1. General
10.2. Driving of steel sheet piles
10.3. Simple anchored sheet pile wall berths
10.4. Solid platform berths
10.5. Semi-solid platform berth
10.6. Drainage of steel sheet piles References and further reading

Open berth structures

11.1. General
11.2. Column berths
11.3. Pile berths
11.4. Lamella berths
11.5. Open berth slabs References and further reading

Berth details

12.1. General
12.2. Traditional mooring system
12.3. Automatic mooring system
12.4. Lighting
12.5. Electric power supply
12.6. Potable and raw water supply
12.7. Water drainage system
12.8. Sewage disposal
12.9. Oil and fuel interceptors
12.10. Access ladders
12.11. Handrails and guardrails
12.12. Kerbs
12.13. Lifesaving equipment
12.14. Pavements
12.15. Crane rails References and further reading

Container terminals

13.1. Site location
13.2. Existing areas
13.3. Potential areas
13.4. Container ships
13.5. Terminal areas
13.6. Ship-to-shore crane
13.7. Container handling systems
13.8. The terminal area requirements
13.9. The world's largest container ports References and further reading

Fenders

14.1. General
14.2. Fender requirements
14.3. Surface-protecting and energy-absorbing fenders
14.4. Different types of fender
14.5. Installation
14.6. Effects of fender compression
14.7. Properties of a fender
14.8. Single- and double-fender systems
14.9. Fender wall
14.10. Hull pressure
14.11. Spacing of fenders
14.12. Cost of fenders
14.13. Damage to fender structures
14.14. Calculation examples
14.15. Information from fender manufacturers References and further reading

Erosion protection

15.1. General
15.2. Erosion due to wave action
15.3. Erosion due to the main propeller action
15.4. Erosion due to thrusters
15.5. The required stone protection layer
15.6. Erosion protection systems
15.7. Operational guidelines References and further reading

Steel corrosion

16.1. General
16.2. Corrosion rate
16.3. Corrosion protection systems
16.4. Astronomical low water corrosion
16.5. Stray current corrosion References and further reading

Underwater concreting

17.1. General
17.2. Different methods of underwater concreting
17.3. The tremie pipe method
17.4. The production of concrete for use tremie pipes
17.5. Anti-washout (AWO) concrete
17.6. Damage during construction of new structures
17.7. Repairs of new concrete
17.8. Concrete plant and supervision References and further reading

Concrete deterioration

18.1. General
18.2. Durability of concrete berth structures
18.3. Freezing and thawing
18.4. Erosion
18.5. Chemical deterioration
18.6. Corrosion of reinforcement
18.7. Resistivity
18.8. Condition survey
18.9. Concrete cover
18.10. Surface treatments
18.11. Condition survey
18.12. Overloading of the berth structure
18.13. In-situ quality control References and further reading

Concrete repair

19.1. General
19.2. Assessment
19.3. Maintenance manual and service inspection
19.4. Condition of a structure
19.5. Repairs of concrete
19.6. Repairs in zone 1 (permanently submerged)
19.7. Repairs in zone 2 (tidal zone)
19.8. Repairs in zone 3 (the splash zone or the area above HAT)
19.9. Cathodic protection
19.10. Chloride extraction
19.11. Costs of repairs References and further reading

Port maintenance

20.1. Responsibility for maintenance
20.2. Spares
20.3. Management information
20.4. Maintenance personnel
20.5. Plant and equipment
20.6. Infrastructure
20.7. Optimisation of design to reduce future maintenance costs
20.8. Maintenance management
20.9. Maintenance strategy
20.10. Inspections
20.11. Rating and prioritisation
20.12. Condition assessment ratings
20.13. Post-event condition ratings
20.14. Recommendations and follow-up actions
20.15. Repair prioritisation
20.16. Maintenance data management References and further reading
 
Ship dimensions

21.1. General
21.2. Ship dimensions
21.3. Recommended design dimensions
21.4. Recommendations References and further reading

Definitions

Conversion factors


23.1. Length
23.2. Speed
23.3. Area
23.4. Volume
23.5. Weight
23.6. Force
23.7. Force per unit length
23.8. Force per unit area
23.9. Moment
23.10. Temperatures
23.11. Useful data

Index
Contents References and further reading

 

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