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ICE Manual of Structural Design: Buildings

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Descripción

Part of the ICE manuals series, ICE manual of structural design is the essential reference for all structural engineers involved in the design of buildings and other structures. The manual takes a project oriented approach, covering key issues that design professionals face at the outset of a project such as sustainability


Características

  • ISBN: 9780727741448
  • Páginas: 472
  • Tamaño: 21x30
  • Edición:
  • Idioma: Inglés
  • Año: 2012

Compra bajo pedidoDisponibilidad: 15 a 30 Días

Contenido ICE Manual of Structural Design: Buildings

Part of the ICE manuals series, ICE manual of structural design is the essential reference for all structural engineers involved in the design of buildings and other structures. The manual takes a project oriented approach, covering key issues that design professionals face at the outset of a project such as sustainability, risk management and how to understand the client’s needs, before going on to cover the core issues of concept design and the detailed design of structural components.

ICE manual of structural design
• Approaches the key issues relating to design as they would arise on a typical project
• Provides an understanding of the key structural design issues at concept designstage
• Gives practical advice on designing structural components to Eurocode specifications

Contents

Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgements
List of contributors

SECTION 1: Fundamentals of structural design

Chapter 1: The place of the structural engineer in society
C.Wise

1.1     Our challenge
1.2     Context
1.3     What structural engineering is
1.4     The changing way we work
1.5     The balance between theory and practice
1.6     The engineer´s relationship to key stakeholders
1.7     Conclusion
1.8     Note
1.9     References

Chapter 2: Tackling structural engineering projects
C.Wise

2.1     What is a project?
2.2     Side presumption (the old chestnut): University is the best place to teach testing (in the virtual, non-physical world)
2.3     Relationships
2.4     The relationship between structural engineer and client
2.5     The relationship between structural engineer and architect
2.6     The relationship between structural engineer, the environmental engineer and the emerging environmental protocols
2.7     Technique
2.8     It is within our power to redesign ourselves
2.9     Getting more from less: Integrating structure and environment
2.10   Enough is enough: A little challenge to use resources more wisely
2.11   The importance of tools
2.12   The power of the engineering line
2.13   The engineer´s toolbox: Rules of thumb for testing
2.14   Integrating construction with design
2.15   Emergent technology as an integrating force?
2.16   Time for metamorphosis?
2.17   Conclusions
2.18   Note
2.19   References

Chapter 3: Managing risk in structural engineering
E. Tufton

3.1     Introduction - the concept of risk
3.2     Risk criteria
3.3     Acceptability of risk - appetite vs. aversion
3.4     CDM - construction, maintenance, refurbishment, demolition
3.5     Construction time cost and buildability
3.6     Service loading, statics and dynamics
3.7     Structural capacity and ductility
3.8     Robustness and extreme challenge
3.9     Codes of practice
3.10   Innovation
3.11   Risk management - conclusions
3.12   References

Chapter 4: Sustainability
E. Green

4.1     Introduction: putting sustainability into a global context
4.2     Sustainable development and policy
4.3     Is sustainability measurable?
4.4     Implementing an integrated design approach
4.5     Construction
4.6     Operation
4.7     Reuse and demolition
4.8     Conclusion
4.9     References

Chapter 5: Taking a through-life perspective in design
S. Matthews

5.1     Glossary
5.2     Introduction
5.3     Through-life perspectives - Life-cycle cost, value and sustainability drivers
5.4     Creating durable constructed assets - The need for a through-life performance plan
5.5     Service life design for durable constructed assets
5.6     The structural and service life design, construction and through-life care processes
5.7     Concluding remarks - Future challenges and opportunities
5.8     References

Chapter 6: Controlling the design process
I. A. MacLeod

6.1     Introduction
6.2     Basic control strategies
6.3     The design process - Inception
6.4     The design process - Concept design
6.5     Technical design
6.6     Analysis modelling
6.7     Modelling review process
6.8     Stability and robustness
6.9     Concluding remarks
6.10   References

SECTION 2: Concept design

Chapter 7: Key issues for multi-storey buildings
J. Robert

7.1     Introduction
7.2     Managing the design
7.3     The building structure as a system
7.4     Achieving the right structure on plan
7.5     Achieving the right structure section
7.6     Accommodating other components and issues
7.7     Tall buildings
7.8     Summary
7.9     Conclusions
7.10   Note
7.11   References

Chapter 8: Typical design considerations for generic building types
G. Rollison

8.1     Introduction
8.2     Hospitals
8.3     Offices
8.4     Retail
8.5     Industrial buildings
8.6     Residential
8.7     Schools
8.8     Leisure
8.9     Conclusion
8.10   References

Chapter 9: How buildings fail
T. Marsh

9.1     Introduction
9.2     Types of failure
9.3     Foundation failure
9.4     Modes of failure
9.5     Material failure
9.6     Design
9.7     Analysis
9.8     Conclusion
9.9     References

Chapter 10: Loading
R. B. Marshall, D. Cormie and M. Lavery

10.1   Introduction
10.2   Typology and method of application
10.3   Combinations of load
10.4   Permanent (dead) loads
10.5   Imposed (live) loads
10.6   Wind loads
10.7   Seismic loads
10.8   Blast loads
10.9   Self-strining load effects
10.10 Fire loads
10.11 Fluid loads
10.12 Silo loads
10.13 Soil/earth loads
10.14 Conclusions
10.15 References

Chapter 11: Structural fire engineering design
T. Lennon

11.1    Introduction
11.2    Compartment time-temperature response
11.3    Heat transfer
11.4    Mechanical (structural) response
11.5    Conclusion
11.6    References

Chapter 12: Structural robustness
D. Cormie

12.1    Introduction
12.2    Disproportionate and progressive collapse
12.3    Basic approaches to design for robustness
12.4    Historical development of design for structural robustness
12.5    UK/European regulations and codes of practice
12.6    Building risk class and design requirements
12.7    Interpretation of building risk class and design requirements
12.8    Existing buildings
12.9    Methods for design for structural robustness
12.10  Systematic risk assessment for design of Class 3 buildings
12.11  Terrorism and other malicious riks
12.12  Achieving robustness in design
12.13  Conclusions
12.14  References

Chapter 13: Soil-structure interaction
M. Vaziri and T. Hartlib

13.1    Introduction to soil-structure interaction
13.2    Methods of predicting foundation and substructure behaviour
13.3    Applications and limitations of soil-structure models
13.4    Ground model
13.5    Structural model
13.6    Devoloping the model with the design team
13.7    Validating results
13.8    Calibrating the model
13.9    Monitoring
13.10  Conclusions
13.11  References

Chapter 14: Materials
D. Doran

14.1    Introduction
14.2    Masory
14.3    Metals
14.4    Steels
14.5    Aluminium
14.6    Concrete
14.7    Timber
14.8    Polymers
14.9    Glass
14.10  Conclusions
14.11  Acknowledgements
14.12  References

Chapter 15: Stability
J. Butler

15.1    Introduction
15.2    General considerations
15.3    Low-rise buildings
15.4    Multi-storey buildings
15.5    Precast concrete framed buildings
15.6    Further stability requirements
15.7    Conclusions
15.8    References

Chapter 16: Movement and tolerances
P. Silva

16.1    Introduction
16.2    Tolerances
16.3    Material behaviour and movement under applied load
16.4    In-service performance of structural materials
16.5    Foundation movement
16.6    Strategies for dealing with movement and tolerance effects
16.7    Methods of measurement and control
16.8    Dispute resolution
16.9    Conclusions
16.10  References

SECTION 3: Detailed design

Chapter 17: Design of concret elements
O. Brooker

17.1    Introduction
17.2    System selection
17.3    Preliminary sizing
17.4    Stability
17.5    Detailed design
17.6    Conclusions
17.7    References

Chapter 18: Steelwork
J. Rushton

18.1    Introduction to steel design
18.2    History
18.3    What is a successful steel design?
18.4    Design responsibility
18.5    Design, analysis, detail design - a virtuous circle
18.6    Design parameters (cost, construction)
18.7    Preliminary structural steelwork arrangements
18.8    Challenges and opportunities
18.9    Case study of the reconstruction of a 1920s steel framed office building
18.10  Conclusion
18.11  References

Chapter 19: Timber and wood-based products
P. Steer

19.1    Introduction
19.2    Timber and timber products
19.3    The properties of timber and wood-based products
19.4    Mechanical properties of timber and wood-based meterials
19.5    Design rules for the ultimate limit states
19.6    Design rules serviceability
19.7    Metal fasteners and glued joints
19.8    Components, planes frames, bracing, detailing and control
19.9    Conclusions
19.10  References

Chapter 20: Masonry
A. Rolf

20.1    Introduction
20.2    System selection
20.3    Preliminary sizing
20.4    Seismic design
20.5    Final design
20.6    References

Chapter 21: Glass
M. Overend

21.1    Introduction
21.2    Structural use of glass in buildings
21.3    Materials and mechanical properties
21.4    Limit state design and loads on glass structures
21.5    Practical design recommedations
21.6    Conclusions
21.7    References

Index

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