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ICE Manual of Geotechnical Engineering 2. VOL

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Descripción

Written and edited by a wide selection of leading specialists, ICE Manual of Geotechnical Engineering is an authoritative and comprehensive reference resource providing the core geotechnical engineering principles


Características

  • ISBN: 9780727736529
  • Páginas: 1570
  • Tamaño: 21x30
  • Edición:
  • Idioma: Inglés
  • Año: 2012

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Contenido ICE Manual of Geotechnical Engineering 2. VOL

Written and edited by a wide selection of leading specialists, ICE Manual of Geotechnical Engineering delivers an authoritative and comprehensive reference providing the core geotechnical engineering principles, practical techniques, and the major questions engineers should keep in mind when dealing with real-world engineering challenges – all within a consistently coherent framework.

 ICE Manual of Geotechnical Engineering Volume 1

Chapter 1 Introduction to Section 1

Chapter 2 Foundations and other geotechnical elements in context – their role


2.1 Geotechnical elements in the context of the rest of the whole structure 
2.2 Key requirements for all geotechnical elements 
2.3 Interaction with other professionals
2.4 Design lives for geotechnical elements
2.5 The geotechnical design and construction cycle
2.6 Common factors associated with geotechnical success
2.7 References

Chapter 3 A brief history of the development of geotechnical engineering

3.1 Introduction
3.2 Geotechnical engineering in the early 20th century
3.3 Terzaghi, father of geotechnical engineering
3.4 The impact of soil mechanics on structural and civil engineering 
3.5 Conclusions
3.6 References

Chapter 4 The geotechnical triangle

4.1 Introduction
4.2 The ground profile
4.3 The measured or observed behaviour of the ground
4.4 Appropriate model
4.5 Empirical procedures and experience
4.6 Summary of the geotechnical triangle 
4.7 Re-visiting the underground car park at the Palace of Westminster
4.8 Concluding remarks
4.9 References

Chapter 5 Structural and geotechnical modelling

5.1 Introduction
5.2 Structural modelling
5.3 Geotechnical modelling
5.4 Comparisons between structural and geotechnical modelling 
5.5 Ground–structure interaction
5.6 Conclusions
5.7 References

Chapter 6 Computer analysis principles in geotechnical engineering

6.1 General
6.2 Theoretical classification of analysis methods
6.3 Closed form solutions 
6.4 Classical methods of analysis
6.5 Numerical analysis 
6.6 Overview of the finite element method
6.7 Element discretisation 
6.8 Nonlinear finite element analysis
6.9 Modelling of structural members in plane strain analysis
6.10 Some pitfalls with the Mohr–Coulomb model
6.11 Summary
6.12 References

Chapter 7 Geotechnical risks and their context for the whole project

7.1 Introduction 
7.2 Motivation of developers 
7.3 Government guidance on ‘optimism bias’
7.4 Typical frequency and cost of ground-related problems
7.5 Expect the unexpected 
7.6 Importance of site investigation 
7.7 Costs and benefits of site investigation 
7.8 Mitigation not contingency
7.9 Mitigation steps
7.10 Example 
7.11 Conclusions
7.12 References

Chapter 8 Health and safety in geotechnical engineering

8.1 Introduction
8.2 An introduction to the legislation
8.3 Hazards
8.4 Risk assessment
8.5 References

Chapter 9 Foundation design decisions

9.1 Introduction 
9.2 Foundation selection
9.3 A holistic approach to foundation engineering 
9.4 Keeping the geotechnical triangle in balance – ground risk management 
9.5 Foundation applications 
9.6 Conclusions 
9.7 References

Chapter 10 Codes and standards and their relevance

10.1 Introduction
10.2 Statutory framework, objectives and status of codes and standards 
10.3 Benefits of codes and standards
10.4 Development of codes and standards for geotechnical engineering
10.5 Why geotechnical and structural codes and standards differ 
10.6 The geotechnical design triangle
10.7 Safety elements adopted in Eurocode 7
10.8 Relationship between the geotechnical design triangle and the geotechnical triangle
10.9 Codes and standards for geotechnical engineering
10.10 Conclusions
10.11 References

Chapter 11 Sustainable geotechnics

11.1 Introduction
11.2 Sustainability objectives – background 
11.3 Geotechnical sustainability themes 
11.4 Sustainability in geotechnical practice
11.5 Summary
11.6 References


Chapter 12 Introduction to Section 2

Chapter 13 The ground profile and its genesis


13.1 Overview
13.2 The ground profile 
13.3 Importance of a profile
13.4 The formation of a profile
13.5 Investigating a profile 
13.6 Joining profiles
13.7 Interpreting profiles
13.8 Conclusions
13.9 References

Chapter 14 Soils as particulate materials

14.1 Introduction
14.2 Phase relationships
14.3 A simple base friction apparatus
14.4 Soil particles and their arrangements
14.5 The concept of effective stress in fully saturated soils
14.6 The mechanistic behaviour of unsaturated soils
14.7 Conclusions
14.8 References

Chapter 15 Groundwater profiles and effective stresses

15.1 Importance of pore pressure and effective stress profiles
15.2 Geostatic vertical total stress
15.3 Hydrostatic conditions for pore water pressures
15.4 Artesian conditions
15.5 Underdrainage
15.6 Conditions above the water table
15.7 In-situ horizontal effective stresses
15.8 Summary
15.9 References

Chapter 16 Groundwater flow

16.1 Darcy's Law 
16.2 Hydraulic conductivity (permeability)
16.3 Calculation of simple flow regimes
16.4 More complex flow regimes
16.5 Groundwater control for stability of excavations
16.6 Transient flow
16.7 Summary
16.8 References

Chapter 17 Strength and deformation behaviour of soils

17.1 Introduction
17.2 Analysis of stress
17.3 The drained strength of soils
17.4 The undrained strength of clay soils
17.5 The Mohr–Coulomb strength criterion
17.6 Choice of strength parameters for analysis and design
17.7 The compressibility of soils
17.8 The stress–strain behaviour of soils
17.9 Conclusions
17.10 References

Chapter 18 Rock behaviour

18.1 Rocks
18.2 Classification of rocks 
18.3 Rock composition
18.4 Porosity, saturation and unit weight
18.5 Stresses and loads
18.6 Rock rheology
18.7 Elasticity and rock stiffness
18.8 Poroelasticity
18.9 Failure and rock strength
18.10 Strength testing
18.11 Behaviour of discontinuities
18.12 Permeability
18.13 Fracture-controlled permeability
18.14 Rock mass characterisation
18.15 Rock tunnelling quality index, Q
18.16 Anisotropy 
18.17 References

Chapter 19 Settlement and stress distributions

19.1 Introduction
19.2 Total, undrained and consolidation settlement
19.3 Stress changes beneath loaded areas
19.4 Summary of methods of settlement prediction for clay soils
19.5 Elastic displacement theory
19.6 Theoretical accuracy of settlement predictions 
19.7 Undrained settlement
19.8 Settlement on granular soils
19.9 Summary
19.10 References

Chapter 20 Earth pressure theory

20.1 Introduction
20.2 Simple active and passive limits 
20.3 Effects of wall friction (adhesion)
20.4 In-service conditions
20.5 Summary
20.6 References

Chapter 21 Bearing capacity theory

21.1 Introduction
21.2 Bearing capacity equation for vertical load – empirical adjustments for shape and depth
21.3 Inclined loading
21.4 Offset loading
21.5 Combined vertical, horizontal and moment (V–H–M) loading interaction diagram for a surface foundation
21.6 Summary 
21.7 References

Chapter 22 Behaviour of single piles under vertical loads

22.1 Introduction
22.2 Basic load–settlement behaviour
22.3 Traditional approach to estimating the axial capacity of piles in clay
22.4 Shaft friction of piles in clay, in terms of effective stress
22.5 Piles in granular materials
22.6 Overall conclusions
22.7 References

Chapter 23 Slope stability

23.1 Factors affecting the stability and instability of natural and engineered slopes
23.2 Modes and types of failure commonly encountered
23.3 Methods of analysis for slopes, exploring their limitations of applicability
23.4 Rectification of unstable slopes
23.5 Factors of safety in slope engineering 
23.6 Post-failure investigations
23.7 References

Chapter 24 Dynamic and seismic loading of soils

24.1 Introduction
24.2 Wave propagation in soil
24.3 Dynamic measurement techniques
24.4 Dynamic soil properties
24.5 Liquefaction of soils 
24.6 Summary of key points
24.7 References

Chapter 25 The role of ground improvement

25.1 Introduction
25.2 Understanding the ground
25.3 Removal of water
25.4 Improvement of soils by mechanical means
25.5 Improvement of soils by chemical means
25.6 References

Chapter 26 Building response to ground movements

26.1 Introduction
26.2 Definitions of ground and foundation movement 
26.3 Classification of damage
26.4 Routine guides on limiting deformations of buildings
26.5 Concept of limiting tensile strain
26.6 Strains in simple rectangular beams
26.7 Ground movement due to tunnelling and excavation 
26.8 Evaluation of risk of damage to buildings due to subsidence
26.9 Protective measures
26.10 Conclusions
26.11 References

Chapter 27 Geotechnical parameters and safety factors

27.1 Introduction
27.2 Overall consideration of risk
27.3 Geotechnical parameters
27.4 Factors of safety, partial factors and design parameters 
27.5 Concluding remark
27.6 References

Chapter 28 Introduction to Section 3

Chapter 29 Arid soils


29.1 Introduction
29.2 Arid climates 
29.3 Geomorphology of arid soils and the effect of geomorphic processes on the geotechnical properties of arid soils
29.4 Aspects of the geotechnical behaviour of arid soils
29.5 Engineering in problematic arid soil conditions
29.6 Concluding comments
29.7 References

Chapter 30 Tropical soils

30.1 Introduction 
30.2 Controls on the development of tropical soils
30.3 Engineering issues
30.4 Concluding remarks
30.5 References

Chapter 31 Glacial soils

31.1 Introduction
31.2 Geological processes
31.3 Features of glacial soils
31.4 Geotechnical classification 
31.5 Geotechnical properties 
31.6 Routine investigations
31.7 Developing the ground model and design profile
31.8 Earthworks
31.9 Concluding comments
31.10 References

Chapter 32 Collapsible soils

32.1 Introduction
32.2 Where are collapsible soils found? 
32.3 What controls collapsible behaviour?
32.4 Investigation and assessment 
32.5 Key engineering issues
32.6 Concluding remarks
32.7 References

Chapter 33 Expansive soils

33.1 What is an expansive soil?
33.2 Why are they problematic? 
33.3 Where are expansive soils found?
33.4 Shrink–swell behaviour
33.5 Engineering issues
33.6 Conclusions
33.7 References

Chapter 34 Non-engineered fills

34.1 Introduction
34.2 Problematic characteristics
34.3 Classification, mapping and description of artificial ground
34.4 Types of non-engineered fill
34.5 Conclusions
34.6 Acknowledgements
34.7 References

Chapter 35 Organics/peat soils

35.1 Introduction 
35.2 Nature of peats and organic soils
35.3 Characterisation of peats and organic soils 
35.4 Compressibility of peats and organic soils
35.5 Shear strength of peats and organic soils 
35.6 Critical design issues in peats and organic soils
35.7 Conclusions
35.8 References

Chapter 36 Mudrocks, clays and pyrite

36.1 Introduction
36.2 Controls on mudrock behaviour
36.3 Engineering properties and performance
36.4 Engineering considerations
36.5 Conclusions
36.6 References and further reading

Chapter 37 Sulfate/acid soils

37.1 Introduction and key background information
37.2 Sulfur compounds in soils and rocks 
37.3 Sampling and testing for sulfur compounds
37.4 Specific problems and how to assess them
37.5 Conclusions
37.6 References

Chapter 38 Soluble ground

38.1 Introduction
38.2 Soluble ground and karst
38.3 Influences on the geohazard of limestone karst
38.4 Engineering works on soil-covered limestones 
38.5 Engineering works on limestone bedrock
38.6 Ground investigation and assessment of karst
38.7 Geohazards on gypsum terrains 
38.8 Geohazards in salt terrains
38.9 Karst geohazards on sabkha
38.10 Acknowledgements
38.11 References

Chapter 39 Introduction to Section 4

Chapter 40 The ground as a hazard


40.1 Introduction 
40.2 Ground hazards in the UK
40.3 Predicting what the ground may have in store
40.4 Geological maps
40.5 Conclusions
40.6 References

Chapter 41 Man-made hazards and obstructions

41.1 Introduction
41.2 Mining
41.3 Contamination
41.4 Archaeology
41.5 Ordnance and unexploded ordnance (UXO)
41.6 Buried obstructions and structures
41.7 Services
41.8 References

Chapter 42 Roles and responsibilities

42.1 Introduction to site investigation guides
42.2 CDM regulations (2007), corporate manslaughter and health and safety
42.3 Corporate manslaughter
42.4 Health and safety
42.5 Conditions of engagement 
42.6 When should a ground investigation be carried out?
42.7 Consultants and ground investigations
42.8 Underground services and utilities
42.9 Contamination
42.10 Footnote 
42.11 Disclaimer
42.12 References

Chapter 43 Preliminary studies

43.1 Scope of this guidance
43.2 Why do a preliminary geotechnical study?
43.3 What goes into a preliminary geotechnical study?
43.4 Who should write a preliminary geotechnical study?
43.5 Who should read a preliminary study report? 
43.6 How to get started: sources of information in the UK
43.7 Using the internet
43.8 The site walkover survey
43.9 Writing the report
43.10 Summary
43.11 References

Chapter 44 Planning, procurement and management

44.1 Overview 
44.2 Planning the ground investigation
44.3 Procuring the site investigation
44.4 Managing the site investigation
44.5 References

Chapter 45 Geophysical exploration and remote sensing

45.1 Introduction
45.2 The role of geophysics
45.3 Surface geophysics 
45.4 Potential field methods
45.5 Electrical methods
45.6 Electro magnetic (EM) methods
45.7 Seismic methods
45.8 Borehole geophysics
45.9 Remote sensing
45.10 References

Chapter 46 Ground exploration

46.1 Introduction
46.2 Techniques
46.3 Excavation techniques
46.4 Probing techniques
46.5 Drilling techniques
46.6 In situ testing in boreholes 
46.7 Monitoring installations
46.8 Other considerations
46.9 Standards
46.10 References

Chapter 47 Field geotechnical testing

47.1 Introduction
47.2 Penetration testing
47.3 Loading and shear tests
47.4 Groundwater testing
47.5 References

Chapter 48 Geo-environmental testing

48.1 Introduction
48.2 Philosophy
48.3 Sampling 
48.4 Testing methods
48.5 Data processing 
48.6 Quality assurance 
48.7 References

Chapter 49 Sampling and laboratory testing

49.1 Introduction
49.2 Construction design requirements for sampling and testing
49.3 The parameters and associated test types
49.4 Index tests
49.5 Strength
49.6 Stiffness
49.7 Compressibility
49.8 Permeability
49.9 Non-standard and dynamic tests 
49.10 Test certificates and results
49.11 Sampling methods 
49.12 Bulk samples
49.13 Block samples 
49.14 Tube samples 
49.15 Rotary core samples
49.16 Transport
49.17 The testing laboratory
49.18 References

Chapter 50 Geotechnical reporting

50.1 Factual reporting
50.2 Electronic data
50.3 Interpretative reporting
50.4 Other geotechnical reports
50.5 Reporting production and timescale
50.6 References


Part of the ICE manuals series, ICE manual of geotechnical engineering is the definitive geotechnical reference, providing best practice knowledge for civil and structural engineers. Written and edited by leaders in their fields, ICE manual of geotechnical engineering delivers the core geotechnical engineering principles, practical techniques, and the major questions engineers should keep in mind when dealing with real-world engineering challenges.

Volume II covers design of foundations, retaining structures and earthworks, slopes and pavements, construction processes and verification.

This volume uses and builds on the principles and concepts, problematic soils and site investigation detail covered in Volume I.

ICE manual of geotechnical engineering is an essential guide and invaluable reference for practising civil and structural engineers, architects, designers, consultants and contractors, working on projects of all sizes.


ICE Manual of Geotechnical Engineering Volume 2: Geotechnical Design, Construction and Verification


Chapter 51 Introduction to Section 5

Chapter 52 Foundation types and conceptual design principles


52.1 Introduction
52.2 Foundation types
52.3 Foundation selection – conceptual design principles
52.4 Allowable foundation movement 
52.5 Design bearing pressures 
52.6 Parameter selection, introductory comments
52.7 Foundation selection – a brief case history 
52.8 Overall conclusions
52.9 References

Chapter 53 Shallow foundations

53.1 Introduction
53.2 Causes of foundation movements
53.3 Construction processes and design considerations
53.4 Applied bearing pressures, foundation layout and interaction effects 
53.5 Bearing capacity 
53.6 Settlement
53.7 Information requirements and parameter selection
53.8 Case history for a prestigious building on glacial tills
53.9 Overall conclusions 
53.10 References

Chapter 54 Single piles

54.1 Introduction 
54.2 Selection of pile type
54.3 Axial load capacity (ultimate limit state)
54.4 Factors of safety 
54.5 Pile settlement
54.6 Pile behaviour under lateral load
54.7 Pile load testing strategy
54.8 Definition of pile failure
54.9 References

Chapter 55 Pile-group design

55.1 Introduction
55.2 Pile-group capacity
55.3 Pile-to-pile interaction: vertical loading
55.4 Pile-to-pile interaction: horizontal loading
55.5 Simplifi ed methods of analysis
55.6 Differential settlement
55.7 Time-dependent settlement
55.8 Optimising pile-group configurations
55.9 Information requirements for design and parameter selection
55.10 Ductility, redundancy and factors of safety
55.11 Pile-group design responsibility
55.12 Case history
55.13 Overall conclusions
55.14 References

Chapter 56 Rafts and piled rafts

56.1 Introduction
56.2 Analysis of raft behaviour
56.3 Structural design of rafts
56.4 Design of a real raft 
56.5 Piled rafts, conceptual design principles
56.6 Raft-enhanced pile groups
56.7 Pile-enhanced rafts
56.8 A case history of a pileenhanced raft– the Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre
56.9 Key points
56.10 References

Chapter 57 Global ground movements and their effects on piles

57.1 Introduction
57.2 Negative skin friction
57.3 Heave-induced tension 
57.4 Piles subject to lateral ground movements
57.5 Conclusions
57.6 References

Chapter 58 Building on fills

58.1 Introduction
58.2 Engineering characteristics of fill deposits
58.3 Investigation of fills
58.4 Fill properties
58.5 Volume changes in fills
58.6 Design issues
58.7 Construction on engineered fills
58.8 Summary
58.9 References

Chapter 59 Design principles for ground improvement

59.1 Introduction 
59.2 General design principles for ground improvement
59.3 Design principles for void filling
59.4 Design principles for compaction grouting
59.5 Design principles for permeation grouting
59.6 Design principles for jet grouting
59.7 Design principles for vibrocompaction and vibroreplacement
59.8 Design principles for dynamic compaction
59.9 Design principle for deep soil mixing
59.10 References

Chapter 60 Foundations subjected to cyclic and dynamic loads

60.1 Introduction
60.2 Cyclic loading
60.3 Earthquake effects
60.4 Offshore foundation design 
60.5 Machine foundations
60.6 References

Chapter 62 Types of retaining walls

62.1 Introduction
62.2 Gravity walls
62.3 Embedded walls
62.4 Hybrid walls
62.5 Comparison of walls
62.6 References

Chapter 63 Principles of retaining wall design

63.1 Introduction
63.2 Design concepts
63.3 Selection of design parameters
63.4 Ground movements and their prediction
63.5 Principles of building damage assessment
63.6 References

Chapter 64 Geotechnical design of retaining walls

65.1 Introduction
65.2 Design requirements and performance criteria 
65.3 Types of wall support systems
65.4 Props
65.5 Tied systems
65.6 Soil berms
65.7 Other systems of wall support
65.8 References

Chapter 65 Geotechnical design of retaining wall support systems

65.1 Introduction
65.2 Design requirements and performance criteria
65.3 Types of wall support systems
65.4 Props
65.5 Tied systems
65.6 Soil berms 
65.7 Other systems of wall support
65.8 References

Chapter 66 Geotechnical design of ground anchors

66.1 Introduction
66.2 Review of design responsibilities
66.3 The design of ground anchors for the support of retaining walls
66.4 Detailed design of ground anchors
66.5 References

Chapter 67 Retaining walls as part of complete underground structure

Chapter 68 Introduction to Section 7

Chapter 69 Earthworks design principles


69.1 Historical perspective
69.2 Fundamental requirements of earthworks
69.3 Development of analysis methods
69.4 Factors of safety and limit states
69.5 References

Chapter 70 Design of new earthworks

70.1 Failure modes
70.2 Typical design parameters 
70.3 Pore pressures and groundwater
70.4 Loadings
70.5 Vegetation
70.6 Embankment construction
70.7 Embankment settlement and foundation treatment
70.8 Instrumentation
70.9 References

Chapter 71 Earthworks asset management and remedial design

71.1 Introduction
71.2 Stability and performance
71.3 Earthwork condition appraisal, risk mitigation and control
71.4 Maintenance and remedial works
71.5 References

Chapter 72 Slope stabilisation methods

72.1 Introduction
72.2 Embedded solutions
72.3 Gravity solutions
72.4 Reinforced/nailed solutions
72.5 Slope drainage
72.6 References

Chapter 73 Design of soil reinforced slopes and structures

73.1 Introduction and scope
73.2 Reinforcement types and properties
73.3 General principles of reinforcement action
73.4 General principles of design
73.5 Reinforced soil walls and abutments
73.6 Reinforced soil slopes
73.7 Basal reinforcement
73.8 References

Chapter 74 Design of soil nails

74.1 Introduction
74.2 History and development of soilnailing techniques
74.3 Suitability of ground conditions for soil nailing 
74.4 Types of soil nails 
74.5 Behaviour of soil nails 
74.6 Design
74.7 Construction
74.8 Drainage
74.9 Corrosion of soil nails
74.10 Testing soil nails
74.11 Maintenance of soil-nailed structures
74.12 References

Chapter 75 Earthworks material specification, compaction and control

75.1 The earthworks specification
75.2 Compaction
75.3 Compaction plant
75.4 Control of earthworks
75.5 Compliance testing of earthworks
75.6 Managing and controlling specific materials
75.7 References

Chapter 76 Issues for pavement design

76.1 Introduction
76.2 Purpose of pavement foundation
76.3 Pavement foundation theory
76.4 Brief recent history of pavement foundation design
76.5 Current design standards
76.6 Sub-grade assessment
76.7 Other design issues 
76.8 Construction specification
76.9 Conclusion
76.10 References

Chapter 77 Introduction to Section 8

Chapter 78 Procurement and specification


78.1 Introduction
78.2 Procurement
78.3 Specifications
78.4 Technical issues
78.5 References

Chapter 79 Sequencing of geotechnical works

79.1 Introduction
79.2 Design construction sequence
79.3 Site logistics
79.4 Safe construction
79.5 Achieving the technical requirements
79.6 Monitoring
79.7 Managing changes
79.8 Common problems

Chapter 80 Groundwater control

80.1 Introduction
80.2 Objectives of groundwater control
80.3 Methods of groundwater control
80.4 Groundwater control by exclusion 
80.5 Groundwater control by pumping 
80.6 Design issues
80.7 Regulatory issues 
80.8 References

Chapter 81 Types of bearing piles

81.1 Introduction
81.2 Bored piles 
81.3 Driven piles 
81.4 Micro-piles
81.5 References

Chapter 82 Piling problems

82.1 Introduction
82.2 Bored piles
82.3 Driven piles
82.4 Identifying and resolving problems
82.5 References

Chapter 83 Underpinning

83.1 Introduction
83.2 Types of underpinning
83.3 Factors influencing the choice of underpinning type
83.4 Bearing capacity of underpinning and adjacent footings
83.5 Shoring
83.6 Underpinning in sands and gravel
83.7 Dealing with groundwater 
83.8 Underpinning in relation to subsidence settlement
83.9 Safety aspects of underpinning
83.10 Financial aspects
83.11 Conclusion 
83.12 References

Chapter 84 Ground improvement

84.1 Introduction
84.2 Vibro techniques (vibrocompaction and vibro stone columns)
84.3 Vibro concrete columns
84.4 Dynamic compaction
84.5 References

Chapter 85 Embedded walls

85.1 Introduction
85.2 Diaphragm walls
85.3 Secant pile walls
85.4 Contiguous pile walls
85.5 Sheet pile walls
85.6 Combi steel walls
85.7 Soldier pile walls (king post or Berlin walling)
85.8 Other wall types
85.9 References

Chapter 86 Soil reinforcement construction

86.1 Introduction
86.2 Pre-construction
86.3 Construction
86.4 Post-construction
86.5 References

Chapter 87 Rock stabilisation

87.1 Introduction
87.2 Management solutions
87.3 Engineered solutions 
87.4 Maintenance requirements
87.5 References

Chapter 88 Soil nailing construction

88.1 Introduction
88.2 Planning 
88.3 Slope/site preparation
88.4 Drilling
88.5 Placing the soil nail reinforcement
88.6 Grouting 1307
88.7 Completion/fi nishing
88.8 Slope facing
88.9 Drainage
88.10 Testing
88.11 References

Chapter 89 Ground anchors construction

89.1 Introduction
89.2 Applications of ground anchors 
89.3 Types of ground anchors
89.4 Ground anchor tendons
89.5 Construction methods in various ground types 
89.6 Ground anchor testing and maintenance 
89.7 References

Chapter 90 Geotechnical grouting and soil mixing

90.1 Introduction and background
90.2 Permeation grouting in soils
90.3 Soilfracture and compensation grouting
90.4 Compaction grouting
90.5 Jet grouting 
90.6 Soil mixing
90.7 Verification for grouting and soil mixing
90.8 References

Chapter 91 Modular foundations and retaining walls

91.1 Introduction 
91.2 Modular foundations
91.3 Off-site manufactured solutions – the rationale
91.4 Pre-cast concrete systems
91.5 Modular retaining structures
91.6 References

Chapter 92 Introduction to Section 9

Chapter 93 Quality assurance


93.1 Introduction
93.2 Quality management systems
93.3 Geotechnical specifications
93.4 Role of the resident engineer
93.5 Self-certifi cation
93.6 Finding nonconformances
93.7 Forensic investigations
93.8 Conclusions
93.9 References

Chapter 94 Principles of geotechnical monitoring

94.1 Introduction
94.2 Benefits of geotechnical monitoring 
94.3 Systematic approach to planning monitoring programmes using geotechnical instrumentation
94.4 Example of a systematic approach to planning a monitoring programme: using geotechnical instrumentation for an embankment on soft ground
94.5 General guidelines on execution of monitoring programmes
94.6 Summary 
94.7 References

Chapter 95 Types of geotechnical instrumentation and their usage

95.1 Introduction
95.2 Instruments for monitoring groundwater pressure
95.3 Instruments for monitoring deformation
95.4 Instruments for monitoring load and strain in structural members
95.5 Instruments for monitoring total stress
95.6 General role of instrumentation, and summaries of instruments to be considered for helping to provide answers to various geotechnical questions
95.7 Acknowledgement
95.8 References

Chapter 96 Technical supervision of site works

96.1 Introduction
96.2 Reasons for supervision of geotechnical works
96.3 Preparing for a site role
96.4 Managing the site works
96.5 Health and safety responsibilities
96.6 Supervision of site investigation works
96.7 Supervision of piling works
96.8 Supervision of earthworks

Chapter 97 Pile integrity testing

97.1 Introduction
97.2 The history and development of nondestructive pile testing
97.3 A Review of defects in piles in the context of NDT 
97.4 Low-strain integrity testing
97.5 Cross-hole sonic logging
97.6 Parallel seismic testing
97.7 High-strain integrity testing
97.8 The reliability of pile integrity testing
97.9 Selection of a suitable test method
97.10 References

Chapter 98 Pile capacity testing

98.1 An introduction to pile testing
98.2 Static pile testing
98.3 Bi-directional pile testing
98.4 High strain dynamic pile testing
98.5 Rapid load testing
98.6 Pile testing safety
98.7 Simple overview of pile testing methods
98.8 Acknowledgements
98.9 References

Chapter 99 Materials and material testing for foundations

99.1 Introduction
99.2 Eurocodes 1
99.3 Materials
99.4 Verifi cation
99.5 Concrete 
99.6 Steel and cast iron
99.7 Timber 
99.8 Geosynthetics
99.9 The ground
99.10 Aggregates
99.11 Grout
99.12 Drilling muds
99.13 Miscellaneous materials
99.14 Re-use of foundations
99.15 References

Chapter 100 Observational method

100.1 Introduction
100.2 Fundamentals of OM implementation and pros and cons of its use
100.3 OM concepts and
100.4 Implementation of planned modifications during construction 
100.5 ‘Best way out’ approach in OM
100.6 Concluding remarks
100.7 References

Chapter 101 Close-out reports

101.1 Introduction
101.2 Reasons for writing close-out reports
101.3 Contents of close-out reports
101.4 Reporting on quality issues
101.5 Reporting on health and safety issues 
101.6 Documentation systems and preserving data
101.7 Summary
101.8 References

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